Anglican Samizdat

February 13, 2009

If God isn’t there why do people care if we speak to him?

Filed under: Christianity — David @ 6:57 pm
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I think the reason is simple: God is there; so is the Devil; both God and the Devil can inspire us; people who protest at prayer are not inspired by God.

Connect the dots.

From here:

The intolerance towards Christians in the public sector is an affront.

In recent days, prayer has found its way into the headlines for other reasons  altogether. Last week, community nurse Caroline Petrie was suspended as a result of offering to pray for a patient’s recovery.

Yesterday, Jennie Cain, a primary school receptionist, was facing disciplinary action as a consequence of sending out an email asking friends to pray for her daughter.

The facts of the cases differ in their contexts and circumstances, but at their heart is a seeming intolerance and illiberality about faith in God which is being reflected in the higher echelons of our public services.

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3 Comments

  1. If God isn’t there why do people care if we speak to him?
    Because they are deathly afraid.
    If He is there – they will have to change.

    Comment by Margo — February 13, 2009 @ 7:15 pm

  2. If God isn’t there why do people care if we speak to Him?

    Because they feel embarrassed because they don’t believe in God.

    To admit that there is no God is embarrassing because most people believe there is and so Satan makes them feel annoyed with those who show that they know God and speak with Him . The result could be that they become proud and rebellious and admit that they don’t really care to know what God is all about and feel annoyed with people who speak with Him .
    Others really believe in God but don’t know out how to pray. These people may get upset because of their lack of understanding.

    Comment by Eva — February 14, 2009 @ 1:26 am

  3. There was a song a few years ago called “If God were one of us”. The singer said (paraphrasing here) “Would you want to see Him if seeing meant you had to believe in Jesus and the prophets and all of the saints” interesting question.

    Comment by Muriel — February 14, 2009 @ 11:13 am


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